American Red/Amber Ale

Primarily a catch all for any beer less than a Dark Ale in color, ranging from amber to deep red hues. This style of beer tends to focus on the malts, but hop character can range from low to high. Expect a balanced beer, with toasted malt characters and a light fruitiness in most examples. The range can run from a basic ale, to American brewers who brew faux-Oktoberfest style beers that are actually ales instead of lagers.

Examples: New Belgium Fat Tire, Bell’s Amber Ale, West Sixth Amber Ale

American Strong Ale

Catch all style category for beers from 7.0 percent alcohol by volume and above. Some may even be as high as 25% abv. Characteristics will greatly vary; some have similarities to Barley-wines and Old Ales. Barrel aging is certainly not out of the question.

Examples: Arrogant Bastard, Lagunitas Brown Shugga’, Kentucky Old Fashioned Barrel Ale

American Wild Ale

Sometimes Belgian influenced, American Wild Ales are beers that are introduced to “wild” yeast or bacteria, such as: Brettanomyces (Brettanomyces Bruxellensis, Brettanomyces Lambicus or Brettanomyces Anomolus), Pediococcus or Lactobacillus. This introduction may occur from oak barrels that have been previously inoculated, pitched into the beer, or gained from various “sour mash” techniques. Regardless of which and how, these little creatures often leave a funky calling card that can be quite strange, interesting, pleasing to many, but also often deemed as undesirable by many.

Examples: The Bruery Sour in the Rye, New Belgium Le Terroir, Crooked Stave Origins